Programme

   

8th Swiss Summer School in Democracy Studies

Advances in Comparative Democracy Research

12-16 September 2022

University of Zurich

s3dss3ds

 

Check the Summer School S3DS 2022 Programme (PDF, 492 KB) and register as an auditor online 

Keynote Lecture

Monday 12 September 2022, h.16.00
Room KOL E 18 (City Campus)
Rämistrasse 71

8006 Zürich

Stefano Bartolini

European University Institute

The Nature of Political Institutions

 

To understand what ‘political institutions’ are, we may check textbooks and specialised works, which provide listings such as human rights, constitutions, state formats, executives, legislatures, judiciaries, election systems, democracy, the rule of law. There is disagreement about missing, redundant or unnecessary items. In perusing the literature further, one encounters additional bedfellows. Party systems, parties, trade unions, and more generally interest organisations are often considered political institutions, as are regimes, cleavages and standard operating procedures of administrative bureaucracies. The range extends further to include public policies and political economies. The list of ‘which’ grows and with it grows the perplexity too. To try to answer the ‘which’ question is not the right strategy. Which political institutions exist logically depends on ‘what’ political institutions are. If we fail to agree on the ‘what’ we are unlikely to concur on the ‘which.’ In line with the understanding of all institutions, also political institutions are here considered norms and rules. In particular, political institutions are those norms and rules that empower the rulership, set limits on the monopolistic capacity to produce and distribute behavioural compliance and define the ‘proper’ means for achieving such compliance. They are what I call ‘conferral’ norms/rules’, to be clearly distinguished from  ‘conduct’ norms/rules and from ‘recognition’ norms/rules’. There is no novelty in understanding institutions as normative facts. The point is to distinguish clearly among different types of norms/rules and to specify the particularities of those norms/rules that we define as ‘political.’ There are institutions that do not belong to the realm of the political and political realities that do not belong to the realm of institutions. The issue is to specify the properties of this intersection area. Whether the ‘institutional’ or the ‘political’ element prevails in what we call a ‘political institution’ is an issue that identifies the constitutive ambiguity of the term and of its analysis.

Academic Programme

Room AFL E 019(Oerlikon Campus)
Affolternstrasse 56

8050 Zürich

Tuesday 13

Panel 1

 

Democratic Election Campaigns: 

Challenges and Opportunities 

 

Laura Sudulich, U. of Essex

with Frederico Ferreira da Silva, U. of Lausanne

Wednesday 14

Panel 2

 

Social Media, Political Science and the

Study of Democracy

 

Andrea De Angelis, U. of Zurich

with Luca Manucci, U. of Lisboa

Thursday 15

Panel 3

 

Diversity in Democracies: Social Groups, Political Behaviour and Representation

 

Daniel Bochsler, Central European University
and University of Belgrad

with Samuel D. Schmid, U. of Lucerne

Friday 16

Panel 4

 

Gender and Democratic Politics:
Are Really Women Who Shy Away from Politics?

Marta Fraile, Instituto de Políticas y BienesPúblicos
with
Mathilde van Ditmars, U. of Lucerne

DAILY PROGRAMME

 

Panel 1

Tuesday 13 September

AFL E 019

 

PANEL 1

Democratic election campaigns: challenges and opportunities

 

 

Laura Sudulich University of Essex
with Frederico Ferreira da Silva University of Lausanne

 

Seminar

 

09.00

Round of introduction

09.30

Lecture

 

Laura Sudulich University of Essex Electoral campaigns

 

Electoral campaigns seek to persuade and mobilize voters. Measuring how they achieve these goals is at the core of public opinion, political communication, and behavior studies. This workshop seeks to unpack campaign processes from a comparative perspective. We will discuss challenges and opportunities in measuring and estimating campaign effects. The widespread use of experiments in political and communication studies has provided new insights into how persuasion and mobilization mechanisms occur.  However, the generalizability of experimental findings needs validation from observational studies. The workshop will cover both theoretical perspectives and empirical approaches to developing new avenues of research. 

 

Frederico Ferreira da Silva University of Lausanne Negative Campaign 

10.45

     Break

11.00

Interactive session and Q&A

12.00

     Lunch break

 

Workshop

 

13.00

Lisa Basishvili Tbilisi State University

 

Importance of TV Media for Democratic Deliberation and Civic Engagement -the Case of Georgia

14.00

Michaela Fisher University of Zurich

 

From newspapers to social media? Changing dynamics in Swiss directdemocratic campaigns

15.00

Umme Ummara University of Molise

 

Why Do People Engage in Direct Democracy? Explaining Turnout in Three Types of Referendums in the UK

16.00

   Break

16.15

Discussion

Panel 2

Wednesday 14 September

AFL E 019

 

PANEL 2

Social media, political science and the study of democracy

 

 

Andrea De Angelis University of Zurich
with
Luca Manucci University of Lisboa

 

Seminar

 

09.00

Lecture

 

Andrea De Angelis University of Zurich

 

This workshop will discuss how political scientists can take advantage of the increasingly available information (in textual data, video, images, and audio) produced on social media to answer relevant political questions in research about contemporary democracies. Albeit not entering into technical details, we will briefly summarize the challenges in doing it and the available methods developed in the literature. We will then discuss works that have employed successfully such a type of approach.

10.30

     Break

10.45

Interactive session and Q&A

12.00

   Lunch break

 

Workshop

 

13.00

Lennart Schürmann University of Cologne

 

It's all about location! Strategic incentives for MPs in the German multilevel system to respond to COVID-19 protests

14.00

Rahul Singh Bais Korea Development Institute

 

Why do we need to democratize digital and emerging technologies to have a vibrant democracy?

15.00

Giada Gianola University of Bern

 

Motivating Participation Through Rewards: How Does Gamification Influence Behavior on a Digital Democratic Innovation?

16.00

   Break

16.15

Discussion

Panel 3

Thursday 15 September

AFL E 019

 

PANEL 3

Diversity in democracies: social groups, political behavior, and representation

 

 

Daniel Bochsler Central European University CEU
with
Samuel D. Schmid University of Lucerne

 

Seminar

 

09.00

Lecture

 

Daniel Bochsler Central European University CEU

 

Social science and economic research are concerned with the orientation of individuals towards other members of society whom they consider as members of their cultural group. In experimental studies, from behavioral economics to social psychology, scholars find consistent ingroup favoritism and outgroup discrimination patterns. What lessons can we draw from the literature on social and economic behavior in heterogeneous societies for democracies? We discuss whether findings in social psychology and behavioral economics, interested in individual behavior, can be transferred to the political realm, where ethnic politics is primarily understood as a phenomenon of elite agency and large-scale mobilization. And we discuss whether and how political institutions may attenuate ingroup favoritism

10.30

     Break

10.45

Interactive session and Q&A

12.00

   Lunch break

 

Workshop

 

13.00

Nicolas Jaramillo University of Heidelberg

 

The ‘Demos’ divided: Limitations of democracies to solve the public-private tensions.

14.00

Junmo Cheon University of Zurich

 

Switzerland’s Municipal Congruence in Climate Change Policy

15.00

Raphael Capaul University of Zurich

 

Patterns of Agenda Setting in Swiss Politics: Opening the Black Box of Federal Laws under Parliament’s Lead

16.00

   Break

16.15

Discussion

Panel 4

Friday 16 September

AFL E 019

 

PANEL 4

Gender and democratic politics: are really women who shy away from the political realm?

 

 

Marta Fraile Instituto de Políticas y BienesPúblicos
with
Mathilde van Ditmars University of Lucerne

 

Seminar

 

09.00

Lecture

 

Marta Fraile Instituto de Políticas y Bienes Públicos

 

This session will cover a summary of theoretical discussions about the  
the general research area of Gender and Political Representation, including the following topics: the need for parity in representation and the concepts of descriptive, substantive, and symbolic representation;the current state of parity across the world; a discussion of the different factors explaining the  
the gender gap in representation. This seminar aims at providing (i) an introduction to the debate about the obstacles (both evident and subtle) that women face to getting involved, participating, and obtaining positions of power in the political realm. And (ii) an example of the design of an empirical study on the demand side of the problem where socialization and gender roles are considered (and tested) as possible explanations for the persistent gender gap in internal political efficacy using both observational and experimental evidence. Finally, (iii) the session will discuss some insights from the supply side by examining the literature on the study of women’s candidates in elections.

10.30

      Break

10.45

Interactive session and Q&A

12.00

     Lunch break

 

Workshop

 

13.00

Okan Akmehmet Istanbul Medipol University

 

Descriptive representation and disproportionality: A gender-focused perspective

14.00

Alix D’Agostino University of Zurich

 

Do nature park citizens vote greener? An analysis of voting behaviour in Switzerland.

15.00

Stefan Kalberer University of Zurich

 

Quality of Local Democracy in Switzerland

16.00

     Break

16.15

Discussion

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